31st Aug, 2015

Damage Soda Causes to your Teeth | El Cajon Dentist

477787597Americans love their soda! They’re fizzy, bubbly, they’re refreshing, they’re delicious…they’re ruining your teeth! Yes, soda. Of course, in moderation it poses very little threat, but a steady consumption of soft drinks is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. It’s no secret there exists a strong link between soda consumption and tooth decay. Heavy soda consumption has also been linked to other health complications including diabetes, obesity and osteoporosis.

We’ve all probably heard the term, ‘Sip All Day, Get Decay!’ It may sound a little naggy but it’s also very true! Sugar in soda combines with bacteria in your mouth to form acid, which attacks the teeth. Diet or “sugar-free” soda contains its own acid, which also can damage teeth. When sipping on soda all day the sugar and the acidity is sitting on your teeth, eating away at your enamel, staining your teeth, and setting off bacteria bombs.

There are of course measures can be taken to prevent and reduce tooth decay.

Some guidelines to limit tooth decay:

  • Consuming two or more servings of dairy foods
  • Drink water – Water is beneficial in more ways than one in this instance
  • Restricting other sugared beverages to occasional use

Sugar in soda combines with bacteria in your mouth to form acid, which attacks the teeth. Diet or “sugar-free” soda contains its own acid, which also can damage teeth. Each attack lasts about 20 minutes and starts over with every sip of soda you take. These ongoing acid attacks weaken tooth enamel. Kids and teens are most susceptible to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not fully developed(Source: WDA.org).

Watch this entertaining and informative video on soda being a detriment to your oral health: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-nPxBF24wM

You can avoid tooth decay and other health problems that arise from drinking too many soft drinks, other carbonated beverages, sports drinks, iced and sweet teas and other sweetened liquids (like fruit juices).

As always, brushing and flossing twice a day and visiting your dentist regularly will reduce your risk of tooth decay improve and/or maintain your oral health.

For more information on oral health call Dr. Hunter in El Cajon, CA at 619-444-6157 or visit www.www.andrewhunterdds.com.

Dr. Hunter also proudly accepts patients from El Cajon, Santee, La Mesa, Spring Valley, Rancho San Diego, Granite Hills, and surrounding areas.

Posted on August 31, 2015 By , in , ,

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